| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Stop wasting time looking for files and revisions. Connect your Gmail, DriveDropbox, and Slack accounts and in less than 2 minutes, Dokkio will automatically organize all your file attachments. Learn more and claim your free account.

View
 

Content-Best Practices

Page history last edited by abogado 9 years, 4 months ago

Best Practices - http://subchange.pbworks.com/best-practices

 

How to Improve Content

Consider the following:  1) Provide learning objectives with each class reading, activity, assignment along with a general assessment rubric and expectations for the assignment 2) Use formative assignments which measure the level of student learning, assignments integrated after a series of learning units, graded assignments which communicates who and who has not achieved the expected learning, assignments may take the forms of exams, papers, projects, eportfolios or collection of products demonstrating proficiency of learning outcomes, and summative assignments which are not a  product, but aa process, results are are used to improve, rather than judge learning, all levels of learning are embraced: mistakes are not only ok but are expected,  feedback delivers information during the instructional process (before a summative evaluation), may take the form of non-graded quizzes (or quizzes that may be attempted multiple times and points are given for completion, not accuracy), discussions, blog posts, or any other peer-to-peer learning experience in which students of all learning levels can learn from each other (with guidance and feedback from the instructor) - see resource - Stephen Chappuis and Jan Chappuis, "The Best Value in Formative Assessment," Educational Leadership. December 2007/January 2008. Vol 65, No. 4. pp. 14-18. http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/dec07/vol65/num04/The_Best_Value_in_Formative_Assessment.aspx


 

Resources:

Formative vs. Summative Assessments

There are two types of assessments that may be integrated into a learning experience. Traditional classroom instruction frequently focuses more heavily (or entirely) on summative assessments. Online instruction, with its student-centered learning approach, integrates frequent formative assessments to ensure students, as well as instructor, can monitor the learning progress throughout a term.

Here are some distinctions between the two types of assessments.

Summative Assessment

  • ·         measures a level of student learning
  • ·         feedback in the form of a grade communicates who has achieved learning and who has not
  • ·         is integrated into a course design after a series of learning units
  • ·         may take the form of exams, papers, projects or ePortfolio collections of products produced throughout a course, demonstrating proficiency of learning outcomes

 

Formative Assessment

  • ·         provides opportunities for practice
  • ·         not a product, a process
  • ·         results are used to improve, rather than judge learning
  • ·         all levels of learning are embraced: mistakes are not only ok but are expected
  • ·         feedback delivers information during the instructional process (before a summative evaluation)
  • ·         may take the form of non-graded quizzes (or quizzes that may be attempted multiple times and points are given for completion, not accuracy), discussions, blog posts, or any other peer-to-peer learning experience in which students of all learning levels can learn from each other (with guidance and feedback from the instructor)




Source:

Stephen Chappuis and Jan Chappuis, "The Best Value in Formative Assessment," Educational Leadership. December 2007/January 2008. Vol 65, No. 4. pp. 14-18. http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/dec07/vol65/num04/The_Best_Value_in_Formative_Assessment.aspx

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.