| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Get control of your email attachments. Connect all your Gmail accounts and in less than 2 minutes, Dokkio will automatically organize your file attachments. You can also connect Dokkio to Drive, Dropbox, and Slack. Sign up for free.

View
 

subchange1

Page history last edited by abogado 9 years, 8 months ago

DE Home
Subchange Home

Subchange Rough Draft 1

Draft 1

SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE PROPOSAL:
DISTANCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Foothill College
12345 El Monte Road
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022
[Insert Month] 2010
Submitted by:
Eloise Orrell, Vice President of Instruction
Kurt Hueg, Accreditation Liaison Officer
Authored by:
Judy Baker, Dean
Proposal to the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges
Western Association of Schools and Colleges
2
Table of Contents
Institutional Summary …………………………………………………………………….... 3
Institutional Organizational Structure ……………………………………………………… 4
Institutional Overview ……………………………………………………………...……..... 4
List of Proposal Participants ………………………………………………………....………... 6
A. Description of Proposed Change and Justification …………………………………………. 6
B. Description of Educational Programs to be Offered ………………………………………. 10
C. Planning Process ……………………………………………………………………….…. 12
D. Evidence of Institutional Support to Demonstrate the Continuance of Quality Standards…. 13
D1. Evidence of Sufficient and Qualified Faculty, Management, and Support Staffing
D2. Evidence of Appropriate Equipment and Facilities, including Adequate Control over
any Off-campus Site
D3. Evidence of Fiscal Resources including the Initial and Long Term Amount and
Sources of Funding for the Proposed Change
D4. Plan for Monitoring Achievement of the Desired Outcomes of the Proposed Change
E. Evidence that the Institution Has Received All Necessary Internal and External Approvals.. 27
F. Evidence that Each Eligibility Requirement Will Still be Fulfilled ………………………… 27
G. Evidence that Each Accreditation Standard Will Still be Fulfilled ………………………… 33
Appendix A: Foothill Courses Offered via Distance Education that Fulfill General Education
Requirements …………………………………………………………………………………... 36
Appendix B: Distance Education Analysis of Foothill Degrees and Certificates ……………... 38
Appendix C: Example Institutional Research Office Report ………………………………….. 41
Appendix D: Foothill College General Fund Unrestricted Operating Budget ………………… 41
Appendix E: J2W (ONLINE) STUDENT EVALUATION FORM …………………………… 42
3
Institutional Summary
2008-09
Institution: Foothill College (Foothill-De Anza Community College District)
President: Judy Miner
1. Year Founded: 1957
2. Calendar Plan: Quarter
3. Degrees and Certificates Offered:
Associate in Arts: 40
Associate in Science: 24
Certificate of Achievement: 33
4. Enrollment:
2008-09 Fiscal Year
Enrollment = 120,438
FTES = 15,726.12 (residents and nonresidents)
Total sections = 6,497
5. 2009-10 Academic Year Faculty:
Full-time = 196
6. Finances:
A. Operating Expenditures: 2008/09 = $81,346,991
B. Percent of operating expenditures from tuition and fees: 100%
C. Operating deficit(s) for past three years: $0
D. Current accumulated deficit: $0
E. Operating Expenditures: $0
7. Governing Board:
A. Size: 7 (5 elected District residents, 2 Student Trustees)
B. Meetings per year: 12
8. Asynchronous Internet-Based Offerings:
2008-09 Fiscal Year
DE Enrollment = 22,409 (18.61% of total enrollments)
DE Sections = 779 (12.0 % of total sections)
DE FTES: 2,968.40 (18.64 % of total FTES)
9. Library
A. Number of Volumes: 91,000
B. Number of Periodical Subscriptions: nearly 700 periodical titles
4
Institutional Organizational Structure
[Insert Updated Organizational Chart]
Institutional Overview
Foothill College stands out as a top choice for students in the Bay Area. Foothill’s reputation for
excellence has been earned by its success in preparing students to transfer, in preparing them to
enter a variety of top careers and in offering professional training and lifelong learning
opportunities to its community. Students choose Foothill because of the outstanding
opportunities available to them, the dynamic faculty and staff and the many support services
designed to help them succeed. Foothill College’s uniqueness is exemplified by the college’s
award winning architecture and its picturesque hillside location.
Since its founding when Time Magazine referred to the campus as a “a mountaintop among U.S.
junior colleges,” Foothill has set a high standard in community college education by defining
excellence in terms of quality, integrity and the success of its students. Today, Foothill continues
that tradition of excellence by offering students a high quality general education curriculum,
high-demand career programs, support services and state-of-the-art facilities. Foothill career
program graduates score in the top 90th percentile on nation-wide skill examinations and
students who gain our associates degrees increase their earning power by 40 percent just three
years after graduation. Foothill students transfer to UC campuses like Berkeley and UCLA, to
CSU campuses such as San Jose State, San Francisco State and San Louis Obispo and to a
variety of private universities including Stanford, Santa Clara, USC, Cornell, The University of
San Francisco, and many others.
Foothill strives for distinctiveness and innovation through its leadership in academic programs.
Foothill was the first California community college to offer instruction via the Internet and now
offers more online classes than any other Bay Area community college.
With the Passage of Measure E in 1999, a $248-million general obligation bond for facilities
renovation and construction in the Foothill-De Anza Community College District and Measure C
in 2006, Foothill is poised to meet the needs of the Silicon Valley far into the future. The campus
is undergoing a comprehensive renovation to update and preserve its original facilities and create
new buildings to serve the needs of coming generations. Classrooms are being renovated,
educational technology updated and dilapidated furnishings replaced. Measure C also designates
funding for the acquisition of a permanent site for the Foothill College Middlefield Campus.
Students attending Foothill College achieve their goals because relevant instruction occurs in an
engaging, stimulating, inclusive manner, and any support service they need is provided. Students
feel accepted as part of the Foothill family and realize they made the right choice in choosing
Foothill to further their education and personal development.
Foothill College values the incredible diversity of students on our campus and continually work
to meet the needs of this entire population. Foothill College faculty, staff and administrators
5
believe that teaching a multicultural perspective is just as important as teaching reading, writing
and technology in today’s world.
Our Vision
Foothill College envisions itself as a community of scholars where a diverse population of
students, faculty and staff intersect and are engaged in the search for truth and meaning. We
recognize that by necessity this search must be informed by a multiplicity of disciplinary modes
of inquiry. In order to ensure that every student has the opportunity to share in this vision,
Foothill College commits itself to providing students with the necessary student support services,
outstanding instruction, and opportunities for leadership both within and outside the classroom.
By enacting this vision, the college ensures that it remains the distinctive and innovative
institution it has been since its inception.
Our Values
Honesty, Integrity, Trust, Openness, Transparency, Forgiveness, Sustainability
Our Purpose
To provide access to educational opportunity for all with innovation and distinction.
Our Mission
A well-educated population being essential to sustaining and enhancing a democratic society,
Foothill College commits itself to providing access to outstanding educational opportunities for
all of our students. Whether through basic skills, career preparation, lifelong learning, or transfer,
the members of the Foothill College community are dedicated to the achievement of learning and
to the success of our students. We affirm that our unwavering dedication to this mission is
critical to the prosperity of our community, our state, our nation, and the global community to
which all people are members.
Foothill College offers:
• an associate in arts or associate in science degree, or specialty certificate;
• preparation for transfer to another college, university or post secondary institution;
• career education, training, and services;
• basic skills, English as a Second Language (ESL), leadership skills and student
development; and
• student support services to promote student success.
Foothill’s success is measured by the following quality indicators:
• Access: Educational Opportunity for All
• Student Success: Completion of Student Goals
• Pedagogy, Scholarship, and Support of Learning
6
• Climate for Learning
• Fiscal and Enrollment Stability
• Reputation: Innovation and Distinctiveness
(Adopted by the College Roundtable, February. 24, 1999; Revised by the College Roundtable,
June 24, 2009)
Proposal Participants
The following Foothill College campus community members participated in the research,
discussion, and preparation of this proposal. This proposal was presented to a variety of shared
governance committees and campus constituency groups from April to June 2010. In May 2010,
a full initial draft of the proposal was sent to every Foothill College employee and student
government representative for comment and was posted to the Foothill College website.
Comments were accepted in May and final revisions were made in June 2010. The final version
was approved by the Planning and Resources Council (PaRC) on [Insert date].
Description of Proposed Change and Justification
Description
This Substantive Change Proposal is for approval to offer the following Associate Degrees and
Certificates of Achievement through the distance education mode:
Degrees
• Accounting
• American Studies
• Anthropology
• Art History
• Bioinformatics
• Business Administration
• Business Tech: Office Admin
• Computer Science
• Computer Software Development
• Database Management
• Economics
• Enterprise Networking
• General Studies-Humanities
• General Studies-Social Science
• Geography
• History
• Informatics
• Interactive & Multimedia Technologies
• Internet Technology
• Music Technology
• Philosophy
• Political Science
• Psychology
• Sociology
• Video Arts - Media Studies
• Video Arts - Production
• Women's Studies
Certificates of Achievement
• Accounting
• Accounting/Spreadsheets
• Art History
• Media Studies
• Music Technology
• Object-Oriented Software Using C++
7
• Informatics
• Interactive & Multimedia Technologies
• Internet/Electronic Commerce
• Internet Technology
• Level II (A+)
• LINX/UNIX System Operation &
Administration
• MCITP Server Administrator
• Office Mgr - General Office
• Office Mgr – Office Computing
• Oracle Database Administration
• Oracle Database Developer
• Video Arts Production
• Web Programming
• Word Processing/Desktop Publishing
In addition, this proposal is for approval to offer the Foothill College General Education
program through the distance education mode.
Relationship to Institutional Mission
The mission of Foothill College states: “A well-educated population being essential to sustaining
and enhancing a democratic society, Foothill College commits itself to providing access to
outstanding educational opportunities for all of our students. Whether through basic skills, career
preparation, lifelong learning, or transfer, the members of the Foothill College community are
dedicated to the achievement of learning and to the success of our students. We affirm that our
unwavering dedication to this mission is critical to the prosperity of our community, our state,
our nation, and the global community to which all people are members.” One of six quality
indicators of success in achieving the mission is “Access: Educational Opportunity for All”
which is addressed by providing distance education delivery (Foothill Roundtable, June 24,
2009). In particular, distance education scheduling provides working adults, single parents, and
students with physical disabilities with greater access to education.
As a means to increase access to education, Foothill College has offered distance education
courses for over 12 years. In addition, it has built and maintained comprehensive instructional
and student support services available for distance education students. Faculty and staff
continuously employ processes to monitor, evaluate, and improve the quality of distance
education instruction and services. Foothill College’s distance learning program is called Foothill
Global Access (FGA). It offers a wide complement of services in support of faculty and students
engaged with distance education courses.
The mission of FGA is to increase educational access for students by supporting technologymediated
delivery of high quality instruction and providing students with a flexible, convenient,
and cost-effective system for achieving their educational goals. The FGA mission aligns with the
College Mission by emphasizing educational access and providing students with the scheduling
and logistical flexibility they need to overcome barriers to success in their educational pursuits.
Foothill College on-campus facilities approached capacity while planned construction has been
underway for the past several years. Distance learning delivery of instruction provides Foothill
College with a means to expand enrollment without impacting on-campus. The college's well8
developed and successful FGA distance learning program, which has continued to expand, offers
courses via the Internet using Etudes online course delivery software. The number of students
enrolled in fully online and partially online courses has grown to approximately 10,539 in the fall
2009 quarter, representing over 12% percent of Foothill's enrollment.
Rationale for Change
As part of its institutional evaluation, planning, and improvement process, Foothill College
conducted a review of course and program offerings including courses approved for distance
education delivery. This review revealed that the number of courses approved as distance
education courses increased by 59.2% from 382 in fall of 2006 to 608 in 2010. The number of
courses approved for distance education delivery is 24.2% of Foothill’s 2009-10 course
inventory of 2,514. In fall 2009, Foothill offered 202 individual course sections fully online as
distance education courses. This represents approximately 10.7% of the total number of course
sections offered that quarter.
In the 2006-2007 fiscal year, student enrollment in distance education courses was 17,920 and
WSCH was 96,606 with productivity of 52, retention of 84%, and success rate of 70%. Fulltime
classroom teaching FTEF was 18.44 and PT/Overload FTEF was 30.85. The number of sections
delivered as distance education was 718.
In 2008-2009 fiscal year, student enrollment in distance education courses was 22,409 and
WSCH was 133,578 with productivity of 627, retention of 86% and success rate of 71%.
Fulltime classroom teaching FTEF was 19.71 and PT/Overload FTEF was 36.01. The number of
sections delivered as distance education courses was 779.
This represents a moderate and steady increase in use of distance education by both students and
faculty since 2006-2007. From 2006-2007 to 2008-2009, student enrollment increased by 25%,
WSCH by 38.3%, productivity by 20%, retention by 2.4%, success rate by 1.3%, fulltime FTEF
by 6.9%, PT/overload FTEF by 16.7%, and sections served by 8.5%.
In 2008-2009, enrollment in distance education courses was 18.61 % of total enrollment at
Foothill College. And, 12% of all sections offered were distance education courses.
Distance Ed 2006-07 Fiscal Year 2007-08 Fiscal Year 2008-09 Fiscal Year
DE Enrollment
Count
% of all
17,920
16.8%
19,167
17.4%
22,409
18.61 %
DE Sections
Count
% of all
718
10.8%
774
11.2%
779
12 %
DE FTES
Count
% of all
1,246.8
9%
2,548.02
17%
2,968.4
18.64 %
9
Furthermore, an analysis of distance education course offerings at Foothill College from 2007-
2008 and 2008-2009 determined that 28 degree programs and 24 certificates of achievement
could be completed 50% or more via distance education by taking only fully online courses. Of
these, it was determined that 11 degrees and 3 certificates of achievement can be 100%
completed by taking online courses. Moreover, by providing approved degrees and certificates
via distance education, Foothill College can address its strategic goal for “providing access to
outstanding educational opportunities for all of our students.”
Submission of this Substantive Change Proposal is warranted given this dramatic growth of
distance education delivery at Foothill College.
Foothill College conducted an analysis of its courses, sections, and programs with respect to
distance education offerings using three different sources of data:
1. The Foothill Catalog, which details all curricular requirements for Foothill’s certificate and
degree programs;
2. The Foothill College C3MS database, which lists all active Foothill courses approved to be
offered through the distance education mode, and;
3. The historical record of on-campus and distance education course section offerings.
Two data sources were used to generate the following information:
1. The number of distance education sections of each distance education-approved course
offered at Foothill during the 2007-08 and 2008-09 academic years.
2. The number of on-campus sections of each distance education-approved course offered at
Foothill during the 2007-08 and 2008-09 academic years.
Using this information, each Foothill College degree and certificate program was analyzed to
determine if 50% or more of the program could have been completed by enrolling in fully online
courses offered over a two year time period during the 2007-08 and 2008-09 academic years.
First, it was confirmed that 100% of Foothill College General Education requirements could be
met by successfully completing only online courses (see Appendix A). Then, it was determined
what percentage of a degree or certificate program could be completed by taking online courses.
This estimated percentage of a program represents how much of the degree requirements could
be completed via distance education if a student only selected courses approved to be offered via
distance education from among all restricted elective options and required courses during the
2007-08 and 2008-09 academic years.
The analysis results (see Appendix B) confirmed that 28 degree programs and 24 certificates of
achievement could be completed 50% or more via distance education.
[Insert: These results were presented to Foothill College’s administrative leadership, the
Distance Education Advisory Committee, and the Academic Senate. Subsequently, the
college’s leadership approved submission of this substantive change proposal.]
10
B. Description of Educational Programs to be offered
The programs proposed to be offered via distance education are already offered with traditional
on-campus delivery of instruction. Major, general education, and graduation requirements are
identical for both distance education and on-campus programs.
The requirements for the Associate in Art Degree or Associate in Science Degree include
completion of (1) a minimum of 90 units in prescribed courses; (2) a minimum of 24 units taken
at Foothill College; (3) a grade-point average of 2.0 or better in all college courses including
Foothill courses; (4) a major of at least 27 units in a curriculum approved by the Foothill
Curriculum Committee; and (5) the seven general education requirements listed below. The
student who plans to transfer to a four-year college or university should also consult with a
counselor for the specific requirements of those institutions. The student must successfully
complete a minimum of 30-35 units from the courses listed below with at least one course in
Humanities, English, Natural Sciences (with lab), Social & Behavioral Sciences, Communication
& Analytical Thinking, American Cultures & Communities, and two courses in Lifelong
Understanding from two different academic departments. The student who intends to transfer to
a four-year school must meet additional requirements for general education.
The Change in Mode of Delivery does not involve creation of a new educational program. Each
program reflected in this proposal is part of an existing program offered Foothill College.
All Foothill College general education, CSU GE, and IGETC requirements can be completed
with courses that have been approved for distance education delivery (see Appendix A) and were
scheduled for online delivery at least once in the two years between 2007-2008 and 2008-2009.
Foothill College Curriculum Committee procedures ensure that learning outcomes and academic
quality of courses and programs offered via distance education and on-campus meet the same
standards. The purpose of the College Curriculum Committee is to establish and approve
educational curriculum policy campus wide. This committee approves new programs, degrees,
and certificates; approves the recommended general education requirements; provides collegewide
curriculum direction; approves divisional curriculum processes; and provides conflict
resolution regarding curriculum issues.
Specifically, in accordance with California administrative code and regulation (Title 5), the
Foothill College Curriculum Committee separately reviews and approves each course proposed
for distance education delivery to ensure that regular effective contact is maintained between
instructor and students. The Addendum to the Course Outline of Record Course Approval
Application for Online/Distance Learning Delivery document was approved by the Academic
Senate (http://www.foothill.edu/staff/irs/Curriculum/CCCdocuments/FinalDEAddendum.doc) in
2009. The Addendum states that:
…it’s imperative that the following are addressed explicitly in the course syllabus and/or
introductory email/announcement. These communication guidelines are the same for all
teachers and are in accordance with J1 Evaluative Material (Section II.A.12) “Provides
students with a written explanation of the evaluation process, expectations and
11
requirements, assignments, course content, relevant dates, and other information.” and is
the same requirement for all teachers.
Communication must include but is not limited to:
• Relevant Dates, Course Schedule, and Deadlines.
• Faculty Expectations and Requirements for minimum student participation
(quantity and quality) for all sections of the course.
• Evaluation Process including the timeframe for faculty feedback on student works
such as discussion posts, and assessments (quizzes, exams, assignments, projects,
surveys) so that the student can gauge their progress. Faculty must provide
substantive feedback within a reasonable time as outlined in the course syllabus.
• Faculty/Student Communication Process including the timeframe for faculty
response to student communications. A response time of 24-48 hours, Monday
through Friday is desirable but may vary based on course requirements and
extenuating circumstances. It must be clear whether or not the instructor will be
available after hours or on weekends and holidays.
• Methods of regular, timely, and effective student/faculty contact that will be
employed in the course (as described below)
• A Contingency Plan for when the instructor is unavoidably unavailable for a
specific period. Faculty must provide the students with a plan for instances when
they may not be available due to personal or technical emergencies. Announcing
(in advance if possible) any absence of greater than two working days and
providing clear options for students to continue their progress in the class until the
instructor returns is essential.
Depending on class design and Instructor preference, the faculty shall employ one or
more of the following methods of regular, timely, and effective student/faculty contact in
all online, hybrid, and web-enhanced courses: (it is recognized that instructors of webenhanced
and Hybrid courses have more in-person contact with their students and would
as such rely less on these methods.)
These effective contact guidelines are the same requirements for all teachers and are in
accordance with J1.II.A.7: “Maintains student-faculty relationship conducive to
learning,” as well as the following student evaluation criteria: J2.A. #11 Motivated
student interest and intellectual effort, #12. Encouraged students to ask questions and
participate in class discussions, #13. Encouraged individual thinking and differences of
opinion, and #14. Used full class time effectively.”
The following methods of achieving “Regular, Timely, and Effective Methods of
Student/Faculty Contact” are recommended by the Foothill College Academic Senate: private
messages within the course management system; personal e-mail outside of the course
management system; telephone contact; weekly announcements in the course management
system; chat room within the course management system; timely feedback and return of student
work (tasks, tests, surveys, and discussions) in course management system by methods clarified
12
in the syllabus; discussion forums with appropriate facilitation and/or substantive instructor
participation; e-portfolios/blogs/wiki for sharing student works in progress; provide feedback
from fellow students and faculty in a collaborative manner, and to demonstrate mastery,
comprehension, application, and synthesis of a given set of concepts; group or individual
meetings; orientation and review sessions; supplemental seminar or study session; field trips; and
library workshops. The Separate DE Approval addendum for each distance education course
offered describes the specific ways that regular effective contact is achieved.
Planning Process
The plan to offer distance education courses was initially implemented through the creation of
Foothill Global Access that would support online instruction. Online course delivery began in
1996-97 and has grown steadily over the past twelve years which is consistent with Foothill’s
mission to provide “…access to outstanding educational opportunities for all of our students.”
(2008-09 Foothill Catalog). In response to the growth of the college’s online course offerings,
Foothill’s instructional and student support services expanded to provide the same services to
distance education students as are provided to on campus students. Now distance education
planning is addressed by several shared governance committees at Foothill College: Technology
Task Force, Distance Education Advisory Committee, and the Committee on Online Learning.
Foothill’s Technology Task Force is responsible for updating the three-year Technology Plan,
providing technology infrastructure for the college in support of instruction and student services,
and coordinating technology training efforts. This committee has primarily been involved in
planning Foothill College’s distance education technology, equipment, and infrastructure needs,
including development and improvements to Foothill’s website and online district faculty and
student resources.
The Distance Education Advisory Committee is the shared governance body with primary
oversight of the delivery of Foothill’s distance education programs. The Distance Education
Advisory Committee has been primarily involved in developing a Distance Education Plan
which includes establishing processes to ensure high quality standards in online courses and
instructional and student support service.
Foothill Global Access is responsible for the assessment, planning, development, and
implementation of the distance education program. The Dean of Foothill Global Access cochairs
the Distance Education Advisory Committee and the Technology Task Force. The
involvement of the Foothill Global Access dean in Foothill College governance is instrumental
in coordinating institutional efforts to meet the needs of Foothill College’s distance education
students and instructors. Foothill Global Access’ core values are to increase educational access
for students by supporting technology-mediated delivery of high quality instruction and
providing students with a convenient, and cost effective system for achieving their educational
goals. Outcomes for Foothill Global Access are: 1) Students will identify their readiness to learn
via technology-mediated delivery such as the Internet and develop the skills necessary for
13
success in distance learning courses; 2) Faculty will develop the skills necessary for effective
technology-mediated delivery of instruction; and 3) Staff will provide technical, training, and
administrative services necessary to support technology-mediated delivery of high quality
instruction. Evidence of success in achieving these goals are: 1) Students will demonstrate their
distance learning knowledge and skills by successfully completing distance education courses; 2)
Faculty will demonstrate their distance instruction skills with completion of required and
optional professional training and 3) Evidence of provision of services by staff will be
demonstrated by steady enrollment in fully online courses.
Foothill Global Access completed a comprehensive program review in fall of 2009 (see
http://www.foothill.fhda.edu/staff/irs/programplans/completedprogramreviews/progplan_AU_F
GA.pdf). In April 2008, Distance Learning was added to the Foothill Program Review Data
Sheet By Department webpage. See Appendix C for an example.
D. Evidence of Institutional Support to Demonstrate the Continuance of Quality Standards
D1. Evidence of Sufficient and Qualified Faculty, Management, and Support Staffing
Faculty
The same standards and process in hiring and evaluation are used for all faculty whether they
teach distance education courses or on campus courses. Those who teach distance education
courses are subject to the minimum standards for hiring that are specified by California state
regulation and additional discipline specific minimum standards as designated by the Academic
Senate for California Community Colleges. In order to teach courses delivered via the Etudes
course management system, faculty are required to successfully complete training which consists
of at least 12 hours of instruction. Certification to teach using Etudes is available by a formal
training program provided by the Foothill Global Access tech training specialist on campus and
by Etudes, Inc. via the Internet. Faculty are reimbursed for the cost of any required training.
The 2007-10 Agreement between Foothill-De Anza Community College District and the
Foothill-De Anza Faculty Association includes a MOU regarding courses that are delivered
through electronic media. The terms of this MOU exclude telecourses and hybrid courses. The
parties agree that distance learning courses offer faculty and the District new and creative ways in
which to deliver approved curriculum through electronically mediated instruction.
Under the terms of this MOU, distance learning assignments should be made in accordance with
the normal scheduling process for part-time, regular and contract, and summer session faculty.
Only faculty employees who possess the appropriate campus training, preparation and skills should
be assigned a distance learning course. Distance learning assignments should be made through
mutual agreement between the faculty employee and the appropriate administrator with the
exception that no faculty employee should be required to teach an online class for a period
exceeding six quarters. A distance learning course shall be assigned a load factor and maximum
class size on the same basis as a traditional course. In order to facilitate enrollment and/or to offset
attrition, a faculty employee teaching online may elect to authorize the District to add students to his
14
or her course during the registration period, i.e., prior to the start of instruction. In such cases, the
faculty employee shall consider retention data and use his or her professional judgment in
determining the number of students to be added to the established maximum class size. In addition,
the faculty employee shall consult with the division dean or appropriate administrator who shall be
responsible for reporting the provisional increase to the scheduling office. Any such increase shall
not be precedent setting, and the course shall return to the established maximum class size at the
conclusion of the assignment. When a faculty employee is required to complete a college-mandated
training course prior to engaging in online instruction, the District shall waive the fees, if any, for
such training. Academic unit(s) or workshop hours earned through this mandated training shall be
creditable toward advancement on the salary schedule and/or the Professional Achievement Award.
A faculty employee may apply for a maximum of three (3) quarter units of professional growth
activity when he or she: a) Develops an online course and is subsequently scheduled to teach it; or,
b) Converts an existing online course to a new platform or course management system when
required to do so as a consequence of a college decision to change its designated platform. The
college shall determine the requirements for earning the unit credits.
The District will provide technical support for the college-designated course management system(s)
only. A faculty employee who chooses to employ an online platform other than the one(s)
designated by the college is responsible for all support functions including student orientation and
training. A faculty employee teaching exclusively online in one or more academic quarters shall
fulfill all of his or her assigned duties. Normally, all contract and regular faculty will teach part of
load on campus. Assignment to full annual load online shall be determined on a case-by-case basis.
When a request for full annual load online is made, the division dean or appropriate administrator
will forward the request, and make a recommendation, to the Vice President of Instruction who, in
consultation with the Vice Chancellor of Human Resources, shall approve or deny the request.
Except when extenuating circumstances exist and are approved by the college President and the
Vice Chancellor of Human Resources, no contract or regular faculty shall teach full annual load
online in consecutive academic years.
Foothill Global Access
The Foothill Global Access (FGA) online learning program provides distance education faculty
support with a variety of training opportunities. This includes formal training programs,
workshops, conferences, and technical support. Training sessions focus upon effective online
teaching practices using the Sakai-based Etudes course management system. Faculty are taught
how to utilize various CMS tools such as the discussion board, the email system, chat rooms, and
the assignments tool to design online courses that foster interaction between faculty and students.
Additional faculty development opportunities provided by Foothill Global Access include skillbuilding
in use of: open educational resources and open textbooks; multimedia for teaching; antiplagiarism
software, Web 2.0 tools, and student e-portfolios.
In 2007, FGA upgraded its technical support services for students to provide greater student
identity security and follow-up. FGA received a President’s Innovation grant award in 2008 to
implement a Pilot Student ePortfolio Project. Beginning Winter 2007, FGA has conducted faceto-
face orientation sessions for students on campus each quarter.
15
FGA coordinates with Counseling to ensure that distance education students have access to
counseling services via the website. In addition to tech training, FGA conducts information
sessions about distance education issues with Divisions and programs upon request. FGA
coordinates with Behavioral and Social Sciences division and the Language Arts division to
provide Turnitin anti-plagiarism training and services. FGA provided leadership across campus,
via a President’s Innovation Grant, in the use of student ePortfolios as an assessment tools. FGA
staff have served on search committees for other programs. FGA staff have volunteered
assistance to Student Services for Parent’s Night and other campus activities. FGA staff have
assisted the Adaptive Learning program with various projects. FGA staff have provided Division
deans with assistance on evaluation of online instructors. FGA staff assisted the Curriculum
Committee in the development of the form for Separate Approval of Distance Education
Courses. FGA staff have conducted several presentations at District and College Opening Days.
Technical and instructional design assistance by FGA staff are available to faculty for 8 hours a
day, 5 days a week. In addition, the Foothill Global Access website includes many online
resources for faculty. FGA provides faculty with educational technology tools including the
Etudes course management system, Edustream video streaming technology, CCC Confer
webconferencing, appropriate software for creating interactivity (Camtasia for example), and
adaptive learning technological accommodations.
Management
Management support for distance education is provided by the Dean of Foothill Global Access
who reports to the Vice President of Workforce Education. Management support for instructional
and student services programs offered via distance education is comparable to that provided for
the on-campus version of these programs. As detailed above, Foothill Global Access services
include: technical infrastructure of the distance education program; Help Desk for students and
faculty; and training and one-on-one assistance to faculty developing online courses.
Support Staffing
Primary support for the technology infrastructure and training of the distance education program
is provided by Foothill Global Access, staffed by one fulltime Dean of Foothill Global Access,
one full-time Instructional Designer, one .75 FTE Tech Training Specialist, and one fulltime
Administrative Assistant.
Computer Access Center
The Foothill College Computer Access Center provides support in the use of adaptive computer
technology for students with disabilities. The goal is to mainstream students with the support of
assistive technology. Hours of operation are Monday through Thursday 8 a.m. through 4:45 p.m.
and Friday 8 a.m. through 4:15 p.m. Access Center staff includes one Lab Coordinator/Deaf
Services Coordinator and one Lab Coordinator/Alternative Media Specialist.
16
D2. Evidence of Appropriate Equipment and Facilities, including Adequate Control over
any Off-campus Site
FGA is actively pursuing ways to be more efficient in the delivery of services including a
planned website redesign that has the potential to decrease student and faculty Help Desk needs.
FGA provides Help Desk services to online students via the Internet, phone, and walk-in.
Internet support is available 5 days per week from 8:30 a.m. through 4:30 p.m. Phone and walkin
support is available Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. through 4:30 p.m. Usage of FGA
services by students and faculty peaks for three weeks each quarter, from the week before the
quarter starts through the end of the second week. Usage also peaks on Mondays. Evening and
weekend usage is light.
All Foothill faculty members also have access to the Faculty Multimedia Center, which is a
computer lab for faculty use. There are 1 PC computer, 1 IMac, 1 scanner and 1 printer. Each
computer is equipped with full Microsoft Office Suite and other software needed to develop and
administer course materials for online instruction. Technical support is available onsite to assist
instructors.
FGA manages streaming video from services from EduStream at no cost to faculty or students.
Santa Barbara Community College District manages “EduStream.org,” through a grant the CCC
Systems Office. Features of EduStream include a digital repository, video file storage (up to 100
gigabytes), and over 3,000 closed-captioned videos including content from Dallas TeleLearning
for use in online courses.
Course Management System
ETUDES (Easy to Use Distance Education Software) was a course management system (CMS),
based on C and C++ and developed in 1994 by Michael Loceff, a computer science instructor at
Foothill College. Etudes Classic was used by California community colleges until June of 2007
when it was retired. During 2006-2007, FGA assisted faculty with conversion of course sites
from one course management system to another, Etudes Classic to Etudes NG. Etudes Classic
was successfully retired in June 2008.
Foothill initiated an ETUDES Consortium in 2002 with the support of the State Chancellor's
Office. In 2003, Foothill entered a partnership in the Sakai Project with Stanford, University of
Michigan, Indiana, MIT, and the Hewlett Foundation in an open course management project
which increased the capability of ETUDES. The Etudes team adopted the Sakai platform in
2004, and has been building tools upon the Sakai framework and core tools since then, with a
goal of meeting the unique needs of its members. Based on Sakai, Etudes-NG (next generation)
was launched in January of 2005 and was adopted by all Etudes member institutions. As of May
21, 2008, Etudes, Inc. is a non-profit 501(c)(3), public charity organization that leads open
source development and offers e-learning services to higher education institutions. The
corporation now serves over 104,000 students at 24 colleges.
17
Membership to Etudes and access to hosting / support services is open to higher education
institutions and other organizations that are interested in the Etudes CMS system and are looking
for affordable, quality centralized support services. Benefits of Etudes include: course
management system hosting and backup services; site and account management; student
information system integration for roster importation and site creation; course conversion
assistance provided; faculty support; learning communities of practice; staff development
training and workshops in tools, instructional design, and pedagogy; and Job Board for Etudes
members. In addition to the above centralized hosting and support services, Etudes leads open
source software development of learning tools that are adopted internationally by higher
education.
Student Computer Labs
Distance education students have access to the Media Center student computer lab as well as
additional computers available in the Krause Center for Innovation, Middlefield Campus Hub,
and the Library.
The services in the Media Center are available to students Monday through Thursdays: 8 a.m.
through 7 p.m., Friday: 8 a.m. through 4:30 p.m. The Student Media Center provides 15 PC
computers, 38 iMac computers, and 3 scanners for general student use in addition to 1 Dell PC
for students requiring accommodation Adaptive Learning and 2 PCs purchased for students
enrolled in Respiratory Therapy courses. Each of the computers is equipped with the full
Microsoft Office suite, in addition to other software as needed for specific course applications.
This lab is open to all registered Foothill College students to use for both class and personal
work. The Media Center provides students with access to over 2000 videotapes, audio tapes, CDROMs,
slides, and computer software related to the classes given at Foothill. In addition, access
to reserve materials assigned by faculty is provided. In the Media Center there are slide and
video viewing stations, cassette players, and PC and Macintosh computers on which students can
view or listen to these materials. The Media Center provides access to the Internet and other
electronic resources via computer workstations and wireless connections. Word processing,
email and participation in online classes are available in the Media Center.
The Krause Center for Innovation operates an open access multimedia lab Monday through –
Friday, 7:30 a.m through 8:30 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. through 5 p.m. The entire Krause Center
for Innovation building is wireless (inside and out). It has 33 PCs and 7 large monitor Macs in
the KCI open lab and 17 PCs dedicated for use by computer science students. One computer
station provides priority use by students needing disabled student access.
The Middlefield Campus Hub provides computer lab services to students Monday through
Thursday from 9 am to 9 pm.
Library
18
Hubert H. Semans Library website provides links to information for book, periodical, and
internet resources. Fully online access to book resources is offered through the online Catalog.
The library provides access to 9,049 eBooks. Foothill College subscribes to several article
databases: 360 Search, Journals A-to-Z, EBSCO host, ProQuest, ARTstor, Biography Resource
Center, Business Source Premier, CollegeSource, CQ Researcher, Literature Resource Center,
and Opposing Viewpoints. Upon registering for classes, distance education students are assigned
an ID number that can be used to access Library resources via the Internet, which are available
24/7. Students are able to renew their checked out books via the Library website.
The Library contains more than 91,000 books, nearly 700 periodical titles, and a large collection
of reserve items, including reading materials for various classes. Electronic databases provide
access to many full-text journals, newspapers, and magazine articles. The Library provides
access to about 9,000 titles through NetLibrary, selected by a committee of CA community
college librarians, plus another 3,000 or so public domain titles from Project Gutenberg.
Records for e-book titles are in the Library’s book catalog. Distance education students can call
the Library for assistance in the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters during hours of operation:
Monday through Thursday from 8 am to 7 pm and Friday from 8 am to 4:30 pm, and in the
summer session, Monday through Thursday from 8 am to 4:30 pm. Reference librarians are
available by telephone, by email, and in person. Reference librarians are available to assist
student with research through the use of traditional print and state-of-the-art electronic resources,
including the Internet.
Foothill College library faculty members teach a one unit Research Paper Search Strategies
(LIBR 71) course, which is offered in a distance education format. This course offers an
overview of information resources and guides students through every phase of the research
process, from defining a topic to finding quality information to writing a Works Cited page. Selfhelp
video tutorials are available online. The tutorials provide information on Foothill College
Library resources, and assistance on how to use these resources. There is also information on
research strategies and online searching tips. Each quarter the Library offers independent study
library research courses designed to help students become familiar with the resources the library
has to offer and to develop their research skills. The Library provides access to the Internet and
other electronic resources via computer workstations and wireless connections. Computers in the
library are intended for academic research.
Educational Technology Advisory Committee
The FGA dean is a member of the Educational Technology Advisory Committee (ETAC). The
Foothill-De Anza Educational Technology Advisory Committee (ETAC) has primary
responsibility for developing an overall strategic plan for technology in the district and
maintaining an ongoing implementation effort aimed at achieving the goals of this plan. ETAC is
a participatory governance committee at the district level designed to be as inclusive as possible
19
of all constituency groups (administration, faculty, staff, and students) from both college
campuses and central services.
Advertising, Recruiting, Admissions and Registration
Foothill College publicizes clear and accurate information about its courses, programs, and
services in a variety of media, including the college catalog, course schedule, The Heights
Newsletter, and college website. The college publicizes information about programs in the
California Virtual Campus catalog of online courses. In fall of 2008, FGA generated a distance
learning marketing plan. FGA assists faculty in posting a promotional webpage for each fully
online course each quarter.
The entire admissions process is available online via an online application and registration portal.
Upon completion of the application, students automatically receive an email message containing
their student ID, registration information, and course enrollment instructions. After the
application process is complete, students receive an appointment to register online. By using the
online schedule of classes and online registration, a student can enroll in any available course
offered at Foothill College. The online registration process also provides online access to the
following information and services: Add and Drop Classes; Fee Payment; Financial Aid Status;
Grades; Parking Permit; PIN Information; Placement Test Results; Register for Classes;
Registration Date and Time; Transcripts; Update Student Information; View Your Schedule;
Course Availability; New and Former Student Application; High School Student Application;
International Application for F-1 Visa Students; Application Status; and Financial Aid Award.
In addition, the Foothill College website provides online access to the following information and
services: transfer information and guides; information about General Education for Transfer to
California State Universities and UC/CSU; information about CSU GE/Breadth and the
Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) pattern. Detailed information
about lower division major course preparation for UCs and CSUs may be obtained via the
Internet using Assist.org (http://www.Assist.org).
Articulation Agreements
Managing and maintaining Foothill course equivalency information within ASSIST and with
individual independent and out-of-state institutions is one of the core functions of the
Articulation Office. This involves submitting new and modified Foothill College course outlines
to the California public universities for online evaluation through the OSCAR, monitoring the
ASSIST database, and troubleshooting course transferability problems and requests. The
Articulation Information and Agreements webpage has links to information and guidelines
regarding transfer agreements with CSU, UC, other colleges, and high schools. The Articulation
Resources webpages provide a valuable link to available transfer information for faculty,
frequently asked questions, current policies and legislation, and Statewide Articulation Initiatives
and State Academic Senate Curriculum Resources.
20
Financial Aid
Students can check their financial aid application and awards status via the Internet at an online
portal called myportal.fhda.edu. Students are able to Track the completion of the loan
requirements on their own on-line account. Upon request, Students can receive a Financial Aid
newsletter delivered via email. Most information and forms for financial applications are
available via the Internet from the Financial Aid webpages
(http://www.foothill.edu/reg/faguide.php) such as Loan Entrance Counseling through EdTe$t;
School Lender List; Stafford Loan Request Form; Board of Governors Enrollment Fee Waiver;
FAFSA. After Foothill College receives a student’s FAFSA application, the following will
occur: Foothill College Financial Aid Office will mail the student a postcard along with
instructions to view their application status at www.foothill.edu/aid. The student can then use a
PIN number to access the site and check their application status and print any additional forms
needed to complete their application. Awards made after the review process are accessible
through the www.foothill.edu/aid.
Academic Advising and Counseling
Distance education students have access to individualized academic advising and counseling via
an online forum and telephone, email and fax
(http://www.foothillglobalaccess.org/main/advising_center.htm). The forum is staffed 11 months
per year by three fulltime faculty counselors who respond to forum postings within 48 hours.
Students can schedule 30 minutes face-to-face or telephone appointments with counselors via an
online form. A webpage with Frequently Asked Questions about academic advising and
counseling is also available (http://fgamedia.org/faculty/counseling/). A 1 unit course titled
“Introduction to Online Learning” is taught by counselors and presents to students the various
online academic and service supports such as the library and the Virtual Campus.
Delivery of Course Material
Books and other required course materials are available for online purchase via the Online
Foothill College Bookstore. A direct link is available from the student information page of the
Foothill Global Access website. Students may also purchase books and course materials from
other sources. Books, articles, and other library resources are available to all registered Foothill
students online via the library services as described in the section on Library services.
Assessment and Placement
Distance education students may take their placement tests for English, English as a Second
Language or mathematics at a college assessment/testing center located near them. The
selected center will need the ability to administer an online Accuplacer test. The student has the
test center coordinator email proctor information to the Foothill College Testing Center to set up
21
the access for test administration. Test preparation information is also forwarded to the student
(http://www.foothill.edu/placement/math.samples.html).
For distance education students who are able to take placement tests at any Foothill College
campus location or at another college's site, the placement tests results are received at the end of
the test session and are also available through each student's portal.
Foothill College also belongs to the Consortium of College Testing Centers (CCTC) which is “a
free referral service provided by the National College Testing Association (NCTA) to facilitate
distance learning. The purpose of the CCTC is to make test administration services available to
students at educational institutions away from their campuses. The CCTC site may be used to
locate a testing center by clicking on a U.S. map to find the center nearest to the student.
These services are provided in traditional paper-pencil formats as well as by on-line, web-based
servers at some sites. A test administration site does not have to provide web-based examinations
in order to participate in the Consortium. All participating institutions must be NCTA members
in good standing, and all participating institutions are expected to adhere to the CCTC
guidelines” (Retrieved from http://www.ncta-testing.org/cctc/).
Tutoring
Staff in the Tutorial Center and Foothill Global Access are currently exploring effective ways to
provide tutoring for distance education students. One method under consideration is synchronous
and asynchronous communications between students and tutors using the CCC Confer software.
This software is provided by the CCC System Office at no cost to Foothill College or students.
CCC Confer has Internet conferencing features that allow tutors and students, either as one-onone
or in groups, to talk, share desktop applications, and write via text chat and whiteboard.
Tutoring sessions conducted via CCC Confer can be transcribed and archived for later viewing
by students and program evaluation by Tutorial Center staff.
Career Services
Basic career services are currently available to distance education students via telephone, email,
and the Career Center's website (http://www.foothill.edu/career).
The Foothill College Career Center also provides an online Job Posting
Board (http://www.foothill.edu/career/jobsearch.php). The purpose is to provide internship, parttime
and full-time job searches for Foothill College students and program graduates.
The Career Center plans to provide online videos on a variety of topics, such as How to Choose a
Major, Resume Writing, and a Career Center Orientation tour. The videos enhance in-person
workshops (http://www.foothill.edu/career/workshops.php). The Career Center website provides
Online Resources Listed by Category (http://www.foothill.edu/career/library.php). In addition,
three Career and Life Planning credit courses have approval for delivery as distance education
22
courses and are offered online at least once each year: CRLP 070 Self-assessment; CRLP 073
Effective Resume Writing; and CRLP 074 Successful Interviewing Techniques.
Adaptive Learning
The Foothill-De Anza Community College District Board of Trustees uphold that, for persons
with disabilities, improving the access to educational and employment opportunities must be a
priority. The board directs the Foothill College administration to take the necessary actions to
implement the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of
the Rehabilitation Act. A student may request accommodation related to his/her disability,
provided that accommodation does not impose an undue hardship on the district. Foothill
College disability access information and procedures for requesting accommodations are
available from the Foothill College Adaptive Learning coordinator and in the Foothill College
President's Office.
Every effort is made to ensure that courses and services offered in a distance education mode are
compliant with ADA and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act requirements (see
http://www.access-board.gov/sec508/standards.htm#Subpart_b). Each term that a faculty
members requests use of Etudes to deliver instruction, they are reminded of Section 508
compliance requirements for their online courses as well as the availability of training and
services available to them with compliance. The FGA Technology Training Specialist provides
training to faculty about online accessibility, accessibility features in Etudes and other
instructional software, and developing accessible and usable online course content. The Foothill
College and FGA websites are also ADA and Section 508 compliant. Foothill College currently
offers services to all its disabled students, including distance education student, using a
combination of email, U.S. mail, and telephone advising appointments. The Adaptive Learning
program at Foothill College has the following fulltime staff to serve distance education students
with disabilities: Dean, Disability Access and Compliance Supervisor, Computer Laboratory
Instructional Coordinator, Learning Disability Specialist/Instructor, Alternative Media Specialist,
Learning Disability Specialist/Instructor. The Disability Access and Compliance Supervisor is
responsible for ensuring the accessibility and usability of all technology at Foothill, including
distance education courses. The Alternative Media Specialist is responsible for meeting the
needs of qualified students for alternative media as a reasonable and appropriate accommodation.
D3. Evidence of Fiscal Resources including the Initial and Long Term Amount and Source
of Funding for the Proposed Change
Funding for distance education at Foothill College is provided for distance education course
management system hosting services, infrastructure, and support. Distance education
infrastructure and support are provided by the Foothill Global Access department. Both the
initial and long term funding of this department are already fully integrated as a continuing
expense through the Foothill College Operating Budget (see Appendix D). This funding is
23
sufficient to provide ongoing investment in technology and staffing to support online education.
For example, existing FGA funding has supported licensing of Etudes course management
system hosting annually; personnel costs for a dean, instructional designer, technology training
specialist, and administrative assistant, and equipping the Faculty Multimedia Lab.
Funding for faculty to teach distance education course offerings is provided by Foothill College
within each academic division, just as funding for faculty to teach on-campus. The amount and
sources of funding for distance education course offerings are identical to those for on-campus
course offerings. Student apportionment revenue, instructor salary, and other major operating
expenses are essentially the same for courses delivered via the Internet and on-campus.
Campus decision-making about course delivery methods is generally made at the academic
division level and based primarily on the needs of Foothill’s student population, the pedagogical
issues associated with delivering high quality online instruction, and the availability of quality
online faculty rather than funding.
Ongoing analysis and future planning for distance education programs and services are provided
via Foothill’s college-wide master planning process. Technological support and coordination are
addressed through the Technology Task Force. Practices to ensure quality online instruction and
student services are addressed in the campus Distance Education Advisory Committee (DEAC)
and the Committee on Online Learning (COOL).
The Planning and Resource Council (PaRC) oversees and drives institutional planning agendas
for each academic year. Foothill College has implemented a change to the program planning
rotational cycle to 4 years, by division, with annual yearly progress reports completed by all
departments. The goal is to achieve ongoing deep reflection of programs and link program
planning to program goals, institutional goals, strategic initiatives, student learning outcomes,
resource allocation, accreditation, and the educational master plan. According to the Educational
Effectiveness Framework produced by WASC, highly-developed program reviews are
systematic and institution-wide, with learning assessment findings a major component. Findings
are used to improve student learning, program effectiveness, and supporting processes, and close
linkages exist between program planning and institution-level planning and budgeting. A highly
effective program review is sustainable, continuous quality improvement, with ongoing and
systematic processes used to assess and improve student learning and achievement. Program
review processes are disseminated, reviewed, and discussed to undergo ongoing institutional
review and refinement to improve institutional effectiveness and program practices, resulting in
improvements in student achievement and learning. Based on recommendations from the
Integrated Planning and Budget Process Taskforce and the Educational Master and Strategic
Planning Taskforce, the Resource Alignment Process is designed to align resource allocation or
elimination with the College strategic initiatives and program planning and review.
24
The Office of Instruction and Institutional Research is currently coordinating the writing of the
2010-2020 Educational and Strategic Master Plan. The purpose of this Educational and Strategic
Master Plan (EMSP) is to provide long and short-term direction to reach the vision of Foothill
College, in support of student learning and institutional Effectiveness.
D4. A Plan for Monitoring Achievement of the Desired Outcomes of the Proposed Change
Foothill College monitors achievement of the desired outcomes of distance education degrees
and certifications in several ways. First, online faculty and courses under go regular evaluation
with input from administrators, peer-faculty, and students. Second, Foothill Global Access
monitors student use of their distance education services. Third, each course and program has
developed student learning outcomes and follows the college-wide annual schedule for outcomes
assessment, reflection, and redevelopment.
Evaluation of Online Faculty and Courses
FGA provides division deans and faculty with guidelines, checklists, and consultation regarding
evaluation of online faculty and courses. FGA recommends to faculty that they follow criteria
outlined in the Quality Matters Rubric for assessing their online courses
(http://qminstitute.org/home/Public%20Library/About%20QM/RubricStandards2008-2010.pdf).
In the 2008-09 academic year, an ad hoc committee was formed to develop a District-wide
process for administration of student evaluation of online courses. This process was piloted
during the spring 2009, fall 2009, winter 2010, and spring 2010 quarters. Efforts are underway to
formalize this process. The largest barrier to making the process official is the low response rate.
The committee is examining ways to boost the response rate. Faculty evaluation criteria are the
same for distance education courses as for courses delivered on campus. Currently, a formally
approved survey instrument, titled J2W: Student Evaluation Form Online Instruction, is available
for students to evaluate fully online courses (see Appendix E), however no officially recognized
mechanism is in place administer the instrument
(http://fa.fhda.edu/documents07_2010/Appendices2010/Appendix%20J2W.pdf). In the past,
FGA has administered the survey instrument for faculty who requested informal student
evaluations.
In 2009 and 2010, FGA conducted a survey of students to determine what barriers to success in
distance education are experienced by Black, Pacific Islander, and Filipino students and how
those barriers can be addressed.
Periodically, FGA conducts a survey of Foothill College students who drop online courses.
Results of these surveys have been fairly consistent with the most common reason for dropping
indicated as “I could not handle the combined study plus work responsibilities.” In spring 2009,
145 students responded to the survey and 33.1% indicated the reason for dropping the online
course was “I had personal problems (family, health, job, childcare, etc).”
25
During spring 2009, Foothill College participated in a statewide survey administered by the State
Chancellor’s Office conducted of students who dropped distance education courses. In response
to the question “How likely are you to register for another online course?” 63% of respondents
from Foothill College (from a total of 138 respondents) indicated “Very likely” and 13%
indicated “Somewhat likely.” Only 13% indicated either “Not likely” or “Not a chance.” The
most common reasons selected for dropping the online course was “I could not handle the
combined study plus work responsibilities” and “I had personal problems (family, health, job,
childcare, etc.).” Over three-quarters of respondents (78.5%) indicated that “I didn’t know where
to go for help,” 82.8% indicated that “I experienced too many technical difficulties,” and 94.6%
indicated “I didn’t realize when I registered that it was a distance education course” were “Not
Important at All” as reasons for dropping.
Monitoring Use of DE Services
The Office of Instruction and Institutional Research at Foothill College provides relevant and
timely information on Articulation, College Skills (Basic Skills Initiative), Curriculum,
Institutional Research, Program Planning & Review, Professional Development, and Student
Learning Outcomes and Assessment. It generates Foothill College Program Review Distance
Education reports on student enrollment, FTEF, WSCH, productivity plus success and retention
by ethnicity, sex, and age at the department, division or college-wide level (see
http://www.foothill.edu/staff/irs/programplans/dept_data.html and
http://www.foothill.edu/staff/irs/programplans/docs/Prog%20Rev%20Combined%20Distance%2
0Ed/FH%20College%20Distance.pdf). These reports are made available to the public via the
Foothill College website and are used to monitor, plan, and improve the college's course and
program offerings for both traditional and distance education courses, grouped together or
viewed separately. These reports are monitored carefully by the dean of FGA. Retention in fully
online classes has varied little over the past 5 years from 86% in 2003-04 to 86% in 2008-09.
Retention and success rates of distance education students at Foothill College are much higher
than at other California community colleges (e.g., see El Camino -
http://www.elcamino.edu/administration/vpaa/Distance%20Education-rev.pdf). Faculty with
retention concerns are encouraged to meet with the FGA instructional designer for assistance.
Student use of the FGA Help Desk is monitored by type of help requested, timing of requests
during the quarter, and frequency of requests each quarter. Since June 2007, 1,684 requests for
assistance have been submitted to the FGA Help Desk. Requests to the FGA Help Desk peak
during the first two weeks of each quarter and mid-way through each quarter with approximately
200 requests each quarter. The vast majority of requests pertain to logging into course sites and
registration issues.
Student Learning Outcomes
26
Foothill College has always maintained that student learning is our central work. While we have
historically conceptualized learning outcomes broadly, including student grades,
degree/certificate completion, successful course and pathway completion, basic skills
improvement, and job attainment, in response to Accreditation changes, we’ve added a
concentrated focus on identifying and measuring particular knowledge, skills and abilities we
expect our students to have when completing our courses, programs and degrees. In order to
accomplish this, the college faculty have embraced and completed Student Learning Outcomes
(SLOs) to identify, assess and reflect on student learning at the course level. Individual course
SLOs have progressed to a cycle of assessment, reflection and redevelopment. Every course is
scheduled to be assessed at least once per academic year with reflections scheduled to be
performed the third week of every quarter on the previous quarter’s courses. This progress has
been steady and consistent. SLOs are published in the course Syllabi along with methods of
assessment. In the 2011-2012 college catalog Student Learning Outcomes will be published on
Curriculum Sheets and Catalog descriptions. SLOs are the first step in a recursive process of
research, review, and re-thinking to insure a campus culture of sustainable continuous quality
improvement
Further, we have established Service Area Outcomes (SA0s) and Administrative Unit Outcomes
(AUOs) processes that identify the unique contributions and efforts that student and
administrative services utilize to support student retention, success and learning. Our new
planning and budgeting processes have placed student learning and program review at its core,
which has further solidified our culture of both curiosity and evidence. In Fall 2010, the program
review process will expand to place emphasis on specific program learning outcomes and our
Four Core Competencies while re-centering our focus from budgetary issues towards student
equity, retention and success.
In 2001 Foothill College determined Institutional Outcomes for student learning in four
competencies, which also comprise our General Education breadth outcomes.
The Four Core Competencies include: Critical Thinking, Computation, Communication, and
Community and Global Consciousness. Beginning in 2006-07 and completed in Spring 2009,
faculty developed a rubric for each of the four competencies to clearly define and measure these
core outcomes. This work is known as the Foothill Rubric Assessment Model for Evaluating
SLOs (FRAMES) project.
In the Winter quarter of the 2009-10 academic year, we began using the FRAMES rubrics to
assess our institutional outcomes by examining the work that individual students have done
while completing a degree at Foothill. (This needs to be one of the SLO assessment assignments)
Beginning in Spring quarter 2010 the rubrics are also being used quarterly in individual division
meetings and professional development workshops to continue to assess student artifacts for
institutional outcomes while raising awareness to support the development of class assignments
that are reflective of our Four Core Competencies. Also initiated in Spring quarter 2010 faculty
27
can identify the Core Competencies their courses encompass while they input their SLO
reflections on the Foothill College web-based curriculum management system. Beginning with
summer 2010, data will be pulled from the system to report the number of courses that reflect the
Four Core Competencies. Also beginning with graduation 2010, students will assess their level
of attaining institutional outcomes referenced by the Four Core Competencies on a web-based
survey. The combination of this qualitative and quantitative data will assess Foothill College’s
focus, commitment and achievement of student learning.
Faculty are responsible for assessing their courses for student achievement. At the program level
student achievement is assessed and published in the program review document. This further
allows for determination of focus and development of program goals. Program review and
planning then progresses to our Strategic Initiatives and Institutional Outcomes, culminating with
our Educational Master Plan.
E. Evidence that the Institution Has Received All Necessary Internal and External
Approvals
All courses, degrees, and certificates of achievement offered by Foothill College have been
approved by the Foothill College Curriculum Committee, the Board of Trustees, and the CCC
System Office. All courses taught in a distance education mode have been reviewed for quality
standards and approved by the Foothill College Curriculum Committee in accordance with
California administrative code and regulation. Documentation of approval for each course,
program, and distance education delivery method is available upon request.
F. Evidence that Each Eligibility Requirement Will Still be Fulfilled
CERTIFICATION OF CONTINUED COMPLIANCE WITH ELIGIBILITY
REQUIREMENTS FOR ACCREDITATION
1. Authority (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
Foothill College is authorized to operate as a public educational institution and to award degrees
by the State of California. Title 5 of the Administrative code prescribes the structure for offering
Associate degrees, Certificates of Achievement, and Certificates of Completion.
Foothill College is a public two year community college operating under the authority of the
State of California, the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges and the Board
of Trustees of the Foothill-De Anza Community College District. Foothill is accredited by the
Accrediting Commission for Community & Junior Colleges of the Western Association of
Schools & Colleges. This organization is recognized by the Council on Postsecondary
Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education. The college is also accredited by the
Council of Dental Education of the American Dental Association, Council of Medical Education,
American Medical Association and Federal Aviation Administration.
2. Mission
28
Foothill College’s educational mission statement is clearly defined, adopted, and published by
the board of trustees. The board of trustees publicly affirms the college’s educational mission
statement, and reviews and updates it regularly. The mission statement appears in the
Educational Master Plan and is published in the official Course Catalog. It is also published on
the college website (http://www.foothill.edu/president/mission.php). Foothill College’s mission
supports its commitment to achieve student learning: “A well-educated population being
essential to sustaining and enhancing a democratic society, Foothill College commits itself to
providing access to outstanding educational opportunities for all of our students. Whether
through basic skills, career preparation, lifelong learning, or transfer, the members of the Foothill
College community are dedicated to the achievement of learning and to the success of our
students. We affirm that our unwavering dedication to this mission is critical to the prosperity of
our community, our state, our nation, and the global community to which all people are
members.”
3. Governing Board (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
The five-member board of trustees of the Foothill-De Anza Community College District is an
independent policymaking board, which ensures that the district’s educational mission and the
missions of both colleges are being implemented. The board also ensures the quality, integrity,
and financial stability of Foothill and De Anza colleges. Members are elected for four-year
terms, and these terms are staggered. Board members have no employment, family or personal
financial interest in the colleges or the district.
4. Chief Executive Officer
Foothill College’s chief executive officer is Dr. Judy Miner, who began her position in July
2007. The chief executive officer is appointed to her role as president by the board and her
primary responsibility is to the institution. The board delegates to the president the authority to
administer board policies for the college. Neither the college president nor the district chancellor
serves as chair of the board.
5. Administrative Capacity (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
The number of administrative staff members at Foothill College supports the services necessary
to carry out the institution’s mission and purpose. Their preparation and experience are
scrutinized through an open and competitive employment process.
6. Operational Status (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
Foothill College is fully operational, with most students actively pursuing the college’s degree
programs.
7. Degrees
57 percent of all educational offerings lead to associate degrees or certificates of achievement.
8. Educational Programs (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
29
The college’s Course Catalog contains a comprehensive statement of educational purpose and
objectives for each of the academic programs offered. Degree programs re in line with the
college’s mission, based on recognized fields of study, are of sufficient content and length, and
are conducted at appropriate levels of quality and rigor. Every course outline contains course
objectives that are achieved through class content, assignments, and activities.
9. Academic Credit
Foothill College awards academic credits in accordance with Division 6, Chapter 6 (California
Community Colleges: Curriculum and Instruction), of Title 5 of the California Code of
regulations. The quarter unit is based on 12 hours of student contact for lecture and 36 hours of
student contact in laboratory. The college awards academic credit based on this standard of
instructional activity. The award of academic credit for each course is clearly delineated in the
Course Catalog.
10. Student Learning and Achievement
Foothill College has always maintained that student learning is our central work. While we have
historically conceptualized learning outcomes broadly, including student grades,
degree/certificate completion, successful course and pathway completion, basic skills
improvement, and job attainment, in response to Accreditation changes, we’ve added a
concentrated focus on identifying and measuring particular knowledge, skills and abilities we
expect our students to have when completing our courses, programs and degrees. In order to
accomplish this, the college faculty have embraced and completed Student Learning Outcomes
(SLOs) to identify, assess and reflect on student learning at the course level. Individual course
SLOs have progressed to a cycle of assessment, reflection and redevelopment. Every course is
scheduled to be assessed at least once per academic year with reflections scheduled to be
performed the third week of every quarter on the previous quarter’s courses. This progress has
been steady and consistent. SLOs are published in the course Syllabi along with methods of
assessment. In the 2011-2012 college catalog, Student Learning Outcomes will be published on
Curriculum Sheets and Catalog descriptions. SLOs are the first step in a recursive process of
research, review, and re-thinking to insure a campus culture of sustainable continuous quality
improvement
Further, we have established Service Area Outcomes (SAOs) and Administrative Unit Outcomes
(AUOs) processes that identify the unique contributions and efforts that student and
administrative services utilize to support student retention, success and learning. Our new
planning and budgeting processes have placed student learning and program review at its core,
which has further solidified our culture of both curiosity and evidence. In Fall 2010, the program
review process will expand to place emphasis on specific program learning outcomes and our
Four Core Competencies while re-centering our focus from budgetary issues towards student
equity, retention and success.
30
The Four Core Competencies include: Critical Thinking, Computation, Communication, and
Community and Global Consciousness. Beginning in 2006-07 and completed in Spring 2009,
faculty developed a rubric for each of the four competencies to clearly define and measure these
core outcomes. This work is known as the Foothill Rubric Assessment Model for Evaluating
SLOs (FRAMES) project.
In the Winter quarter of the 2009-10 academic year, we began using the FRAMES rubrics to
assess our institutional outcomes by examining the work that individual students have done
while completing a degree at Foothill. (This needs to be one of the SLO assessment assignments)
Beginning in Spring quarter 2010 the rubrics are also being used quarterly in individual division
meetings and professional development workshops to continue to assess student artifacts for
institutional outcomes while raising awareness to support the development of class assignments
that are reflective of our Four Core Competencies. Also initiated in Spring quarter 2010 faculty
can identify the Core Competencies their courses encompass while they input their SLO
reflections on the Foothill College web-based curriculum management system. Beginning with
summer 2010, data will be pulled from the system to report the number of courses that reflect the
Four Core Competencies. Also beginning with graduation 2010, students will assess their level
of attaining institutional outcomes referenced by the Four Core Competencies on a web-based
survey. The combination of this qualitative and quantitative data will assess Foothill College’s
focus, commitment and achievement of student learning.
Faculty are responsible for assessing their courses for student achievement. At the program level
student achievement is assessed and published in the program review document. This further
allows for determination of focus and development of program goals. Program review and
planning then progresses to our Strategic Initiatives and Institutional Outcomes, culminating with
our Educational Master Plan.
11. General Education
In 2009, the Foothill College Curriculum Committee changed the General Education
requirements. The revisions standardized the criteria for courses to qualify as meeting
requirements in each of seven areas: Humanities, English, Natural Sciences (with lab), Social &
Behavioral Sciences, Communication & Analytical Thinking, United States Cultures &
Communities, and Lifelong Understanding. All degree programs require a minimum of 30–35
units of general education to ensure breadth of knowledge and to promote intellectual inquiry.
Mathematics and writing requirements are also stipulated in the above requirements. The
institution’s general education program is scrutinized for rigor and quality by the College
Curriculum Committee.
12. Academic Freedom (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
31
The college’s faculty and students are free to examine and test all knowledge appropriate to their
discipline or area of major study as ensured by the Board Policy 4190 on academic freedom.
13. Faculty
Foothill College has an adequate core of qualified faculty with full-time responsibility to support
the college’s educational programs. The number of full-time qualified contract faculty has fairly
remained steady since the last accreditation visit in 2005, and currently numbers 196. The faculty
contract clearly denotes the responsibilities of faculty members. Faculty members are responsible
for conducting program review, curriculum development, and assessment of learning outcomes.
Faculty duties and responsibilities are clearly outlined in the Faculty Agreement.
14. Student Services (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
Student services are comprehensive and accessible to all students. The array of services is
provided based on the college mission and on the assessment of student needs.
15. Admissions (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
Foothill College maintains an “open door” admissions policy. This policy is consistent
with the college mission statement, the Education Code, Title 5 regulations, and the statewide
mission for California Community Colleges. These policies are printed in the college catalog and
made available via the Foothill College website.
16. Information and Learning Resources
Responsibility for management of the Learning Resource Center and Library has shifted to the
Dean of Language Arts. The college houses a variety of media collections and is staffed to assist
students in their use. Internet access and online computer search capabilities are available
without charge to students in the library, in computer labs, and in open media centers. The
college is committed to enhancing its learning resources, regardless of location or delivery
method.
17. Financial Resources (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
The college maintains and documents a funding base, financial resources, and plans for financial
development adequate to support student learning programs and services, to improve institutional
effectiveness, and to assure financial stability.
18. Financial Accountability (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
Annual financial audits are conducted by externally contracted certified public accountants. The
board of trustees reviews these audit reports on an annual basis. The financial audit and
management responses to any exceptions are reviewed and discussed in public sessions.
19. Institutional Planning and Evaluation
32
The college has continued to foster a culture of evidence that serves as the foundation for the
critical and continuous cycle of assessing and improving campus programs and policies.
Institutional planning and program evaluation is systematic for all departments and divisions of
the college, including instruction, student services, and administrative services. The focus in all
three areas is to enhance student learning. The Office of Instruction and Institutional Research is
currently coordinating the writing of the 2010-2020 Educational and Strategic Master Plan. The
purpose of this Educational and Strategic Master Plan (EMSP) is to provide long and short-term
direction to reach the vision of Foothill College, in support of student learning and institutional
effectiveness. The Integrated Planning and Budgeting Process Task Force convened to develop
new planning and budgeting structures that lead to “sustainable quality improvement” in
response to 2002 Standards of Accreditation as established by ACCJC. The overarching goal of
the Task Force was to propose an integrated and cyclical planning and budgeting model that
enables our college to more effectively use existing resources to drive our Strategic Plan and to
support student learning. The charge was to begin using these new decision-making processes
during the 2009-10 academic year. Foothill College has implemented a change to the program
planning rotational cycle to 4 years, by division, with annual yearly progress reports completed
by all departments.
20. Public Information (no change since last accreditation visit in 2005)
Beginning in 2010, the catalog will be available via the Internet primarily. Foothill College
publishes in its catalog and schedule, and posts on its Web site, precise and up-to-date
information on the following: General Information: (including educational mission; course,
program, and degree offerings; academic calendar and program length; academic freedom
statement; available student financial aid; available learning resources; names and degrees of
administrators and faculty; and names of board of trustees members) Requirements: (including
admissions; student fees and other financial obligations; and degree, certificate, graduation, and
transfer requirements) Major Policies Affecting Students.
21. Relations with the Accrediting Commission
Foothill College submitted a focused mid-term report to the Accrediting Commission in 2008
which was accepted in January of 2009 with no visit required. The college describes itself in
identical terms to all its accrediting agencies, communicates any changes in its accredited status,
and agrees to disclose information required by the commission to carry out accrediting
responsibilities. All disclosures by the college are complete, accurate, and honest.
G. Evidence that Each Accreditation Standard Will Still be Fulfilled
CERTIFICATION OF CONTINUED COMPLIANCE WITH ELIGIBILITY
REQUIREMENTS FOR ACCREDITATION
Foothill College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior
Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. This organization is recognized by
the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education.
33
The college maintains its accreditation by fulfilling criteria that are determined by the ACCJC.
Throughout its continuous six-year review cycle, Foothill College conducts and publishes several
review instruments, including an annual report, annual fiscal report, midterm report,
comprehensive institutional self-study, and an evaluation review by a team of peers. Foothill’s
last accreditation visit was in 2005 and resulted in the reaffirmation of accreditation with a
focused midterm report due in 2008. The focused midterm report was accepted in January 2009
with no visit required. The college’s next accreditation visit is scheduled for 2012. Accreditation
standards that are particularly impacted by the proposed change are discussed in detail below.
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness
The institution demonstrates strong commitment to a mission that emphasizes achievement
of student learning and to communicating the mission internally and externally. The
institution uses analyses of quantitative and qualitative data and analysis in an ongoing and
systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning, implementation, and re-evaluation to
verify and improve the effectiveness by which the mission is accomplished.
This proposal reflects Foothill College’s efforts to address its institutional mission with ongoing
and systematic evaluation. Specifically, the mission of Foothill College is to “A well-educated
population being essential to sustaining and enhancing a democratic society, Foothill College
commits itself to providing access to outstanding educational opportunities for all of our
students. Whether through basic skills, career preparation, lifelong learning, or transfer, the
members of the Foothill College community are dedicated to the achievement of learning and to
the success of our students. We affirm that our unwavering dedication to this mission is critical
to the prosperity of our community, our state, our nation, and the global community to which all
people are members.” (2008-09 Foothill Catalog, p. 10) Foothill has offered distance education
courses for over twelve years in an effort to meet the needs of a diverse student population that
includes working adults, single parents, and students with physical disabilities. Foothill has also
developed a comprehensive array of instructional and student support services available in a
distance education format. Concurrently, the college has developed the processes to monitor,
evaluate, and improve the quality of distance education instruction and services that parallels the
processes used to improve the quality of on-campus instruction and services.
As part of Foothill’s institutional evaluation, planning, and improvement cycle, the college
conducted a review of its course and program offerings in 2007-2008 and 2008-09, including
courses approved to be offered via distance education. This review revealed that the number of
courses approved as distance education courses increased from 382 in fall of 2006 to 499 in
2010. The number of courses approved for distance education delivery is 19.8% of Foothill’s
2009-10 course inventory of 2,525.
Further quantitative and qualitative analysis resulted in a campus-wide decision to request 28
degree programs and 23 certificates of achievement identified previously to be approved for
34
delivery in the distance education mode. The implementation of distance education programs is
aligned with Foothill’s mission and strategic goals. All Foothill courses and programs are subject
to regular cycles of evaluation and improvement, regardless of location or method of delivery.
All programs proposed to be offered via distance education are already offered on-campus and
already participate in the program review process.
Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services
The institution offers high-quality instructional programs, student support services, and
library and learning support services that facilitate and demonstrate the achievement of
stated student learning outcomes. The institution provides an environment that supports
learning, enhances student understanding and appreciation of diversity, and encourages
personal and civic responsibility as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development
for all of its students.
A. Instructional Programs: Foothill College’s strategic plan was developed by a taskforce
comprised of representatives from the Academic Senate, Classified Senate, Associated Students
of Foothill College, and Office of Instruction and Institutional Research Task Force. The first
step in engaging campus-wide dialogue began on April 15, 2009. The objectives of this
"visioning the future" session were to:
1. Bring voices together from around the campus;
2. Establish a foundation for future discussions;
3. Reaffirm, and rework where needed, our mission, vision, values statements;
4. Examine our planning assumptions (and data behind them) used by the task force to develop
proposed strategic planning goals.
B. Student Support Services: Foothill College provides distance education students with student
support services that are comparable in quality with services for on-campus students. A
concerted effort has been made to raise awareness among staff and administrators of the need for
continued support of quality student services for distance education students.
C. Library and Learning Support Services: Library and learning support services are readily
available for distance education students. Librarians are available for one-on-one assistance to
distance education students during normal working hours via an Ask a Librarian link in the
Library website. Librarians also teach research skills in a course offered online and through
workshops and tutorials. The Tutorial Center is exploring ways to make their services more
available to distance education students.
Standard III: Resources
The institution effectively uses its human, physical, technology, and financial resources to
achieve its broad educational purposes, including stated student learning outcomes, and to
improve institutional effectiveness.
35
Foothill College has provided a robust and comprehensive distance education program for over
12 years.
Standard IV: Leadership and Governance
The institution recognizes and utilizes the contributions of leadership throughout the
organization for continuous improvement of the institution. Governance roles are designed
to facilitate decisions that support student learning programs and services and improve
institutional effectiveness, while acknowledging the designated responsibilities of the
governing board and the chief administrator.
In accordance with California administrative code and regulation (Title 5), all courses and
programs, regardless of delivery method, are approved by the Foothill College Curriculum
Committee.
36
Appendix A: Foothill Courses Offered via Distance Education that Fulfill General
Education Requirements
Courses highlighted in yellow are offered via distance education.
Associate in Arts Degree or Associate in Science Degree/General Education Requirements
& Graduation Requirements 2009 - 2010
The requirements for the Associate in Art Degree or Associate in Science Degree include
completion of (1) a minimum of 90 units in prescribed courses; (2) a minimum of 24 units taken
at Foothill College; (3) a grade-point average of 2.0 or better in all college courses including
Foothill courses; (4) a major of at least 27 units in a curriculum approved by the Foothill
Curriculum Committee; and (5) the seven general education requirements listed below. The
student who plans to transfer to a four-year college or university should also consult with a
counselor for the specific requirements of those institutions.
The student must successfully complete a minimum of 30-35 units from the courses listed below
with at least one course in Humanities, English, Natural Sciences (with lab), Social & Behavioral
Sciences, Communication & Analytical Thinking, United States Cultures & Communities, and
two courses in Lifelong Understanding from two different academic departments.
Courses may only be used in one area.
Area I—Humanities
Arts: ART 1, 2A, 2AH, 2B, 2BH, 2C, 2CH, 2D, 2E, 4A with 4AX, 5A with 5AX, 11, 14, 36,
45A with 45AX; F A 1; GID 1; MUS 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, 3C, 7, 7D, 7E, 8, 8H, 10, 64A,
64B, 85A, 85B; PHOT 1, 5, 8, 8H, 10, 11; THTR 1, 5, 5B, 20A, 20B, 20C, 20D, 24, 30; VART
2A, 2B, 2C, 36B; WMN 15.
Letters: CHIN 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 13A, 13B, 14A, 14B, 25A, 25B; COMM 24; CRWR 6, 36B, 39A,
39B, 40, 41A, 41B, 60; ENGL 5, 8, 11, 12, 14, 17, 22, 23, 25, 25H, 26, 31, 32, 42A, 42B, 42C,
43, 45, 46A, 46B, 46C, 48A, 48B, 48C; FREN 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 13A, 13B, 14A, 14B, 25A, 25B,
39; GERM 1, 2, 3, 39; HIST 4A, 4B, 4C, 4CH; HUMN 1A, 1B; JAPN 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 13A, 13B,
25A, 25B, 33; LING 23, 25, 25H, 26; PHIL 2, 4, 8, 11, 20A, 22, 24, 25; SPAN 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,
10A, 13A, 13B, 14A, 14B, 25A, 25B; THTR 2A, 2B, 2C, 8.
Area II—English
ENGL 1A, 1AH; ESL 26.
Area III—Natural Sciences (with laboratory)
ASTR 10A with 10L, 10B with 10L, 10BH with 10L; BIOL 1A, 1B, 1C, 9 with 9L, 10, 13, 14,
15, 40A, 40B, 40C, 41; CHEM 1A, 10, 25, 30A; GEOG 1; HORT 10; PHYS 2A, 4A, 10.
37
Area IV —Social & Behavioral Sciences
ANTH 1, 2A, 2B, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8; BUSI 22, 53; CHLD 55; ECON 1A, 1B, 9, 12, 25; GEOG 1, 2, 5,
9, 10; GERM 8; HIST 4A, 4B, 4C, 4CH, 8, 9, 9H, 10, 15, 16, 16H, 17A, 17B, 17C, 18, 19, 20,
23A, 30; POLI 1, 2, 2H, 3, 3H, 5, 7, 8, 9, 15, 15H; PSYC 1, 4, 10, 14, 21, 22, 25, 30, 33, 40, 49,
55; SOC 1, 10, 11, 15, 19, 20, 21, 23, 30, 40; SOSC 20, WMN 5, 11, 21.
Area V—Communication & Analytical Thinking
CIS 12A, 15A, 18, 25A; COMM 1A, 1B, 2, 3, 4, 12, 24, 30, 46, 55; ENGL 1B, 1BH, 4; MATH
1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 10, 11, 12, 22, 44, 46, 49, 51; PHIL 1, 7, 8, 50.
Area VI—United States Cultures & Communities
ANTH 4; ART 2D; BIOL 14; CHLD 11; COMM 10, 12; ENGL 5, 8, 12, 31, 41, 48A, 48B, 48C;
HIST 9, 9H, 10; MUS 8, 8H; PHIL 22; PHOT 8, 8H; POLI 7; PSYC 22; SOC 8, 23; SOSC 20;
SPED 61; THTR 8; WMN 5, 11.
Area VII—Lifelong Understanding
The student must successfully complete a total of four units or more in Lifelong Understanding
from two different academic departments. For the purpose of this area, ALAP, DANC and
PHED will be considered one academic department and COIN and CIS will be considered one
academic department.
BIOL 8, 9, 45; BUSI 91L; CIS 2, 50A, 60; COIN 51; CNSL 1, 2, 72, 80, 90; COMM 2, 10, 12;
CRLP 55, 70; DANC 1A, 1B, 2, 3A, 3B, 4, 5, 6, 7; HLTH 21; PHED 4; any physical activity
course (PHED) or ALAP ALAP 60, 60X, 61, 61X, 62, 62X, 63, 63X, 64, 64X, 65, 65X, 66, 66X,
70, 70X, 71, 71X, 80, 80X; LIBR 1, 50, 71; SOC 19, 40; SOSC 20; SPED 52, 61, 72.
Petition for Graduation
Minimum proficiency: ENGL 1A or ESL 26 and MATH 105*, completed with a letter grade
of “C” or better.*
*Intermediate algebra or equivalent means MATH 105, or mathematics placement test score
indicating eligibility for a mathematics course beyond the level of MATH 105, or completion of a
higher level course with a grade of "C" or better, or completion of a bachelor’s degree or higher
from an accredited U.S. college or university.
38
Appendix B: Distance Education Analysis of Foothill Degrees and Certificates – Courses
with Distance Ed Approval Offered at least once during Fall 2007- Spring 2009
Degree Program
Disciplinespecific
Units
Required
Discipline
Units Avail
as DE
% Total
Discipline
Units Avail
as DE
Prerequisite
Units
Required
Prerequisite
Units Avail
as DE
% Total Prereq
Units Avail as
DE
Accounting 48 43
90%
0 0 0%
American Studies 33.5 29.5
88%
0 0 0%
Anthropology 32 32
100%
0 0 0%
Art History 48 43.5
91%
0 0 0%
Business
Administration 51 42
82%
0 0 0%
Business Tech:
Office Admin 60 38
63%
5.5 0 0%
Computer
Science 55 55
100%
9 9 100%
Computer
Software
Development 45 45
100%
0 0 0%
Database
Management 40 40
100%
0 0 0%
Economics 30 30
100%
0 0 0%
Enterprise
Networking 55 50
91%
0 0 0%
General Studies-
Humanities 28 16
57%
0 0 0%
General Studies-
Social Science 34 34
100%
0 0 0%
Geography 33 33
100%
0 0 0%
History 36 36
100%
0 0 0%
Informatics 66 44
67%
0 0 0%
Interactive &
Multimedia
Technologies 50 38
76%
0 0 0%
Internet
Technology –
Electronic
Business Major 45 42
93%
5 5 100%
Internet
Technology –
Web
Programming 41 37
90%
5 5 100%
39
Major
Internet
Technology –
Web Admin Major 40 40
100%
5 5 100%
Music
Technology 48 40
83%
0 0 0%
Philosophy 33 22
67%
0 0 0%
Political Science 35 22
63%
0 0 0%
Psychology 33 33
100%
0 0 0%
Sociology 30 30
100%
0 0 0%
Video Arts -
Media Studies 48.5 28.5
59%
0 0 0%
Video Arts
Production 49 42
86%
0 0 0%
Women's Studies 32.5 28.5
88%
0 0 0%
Certificate of
Achievement
Program
Total Units
Required
Total Units
Avail as
DE
% Total
Discipline
Units Avail
as DE
Prerequisite
Units
Required
Prerequisite
Units Avail
as DE
% Total Prereq
Units Avail as
DE
Accounting 38 33
87%
0 0 0
Accounting/
Spreadsheets 36 21
58%
5.5 0 0%
Art History 48 22.5
47%
0 0 0
Database/SQL 37 25
68%
5.5 0 0%
Informatics 66 44
67%
0 0 0%
Interactive &
Multimedia
Technologies 50 38
76%
0 0 0
Internet/Electroni
c Commerce 39 27
69%
5.5 0 0%
Internet
Technology –
Electronic
Business Major 45 42
93%
5 5 100%
Internet
Technology –
Web
Programming
Major 41 37
90%
5 5 100%
Internet
Technology – 40 40
100%
5 5 100%
40
Web Admin Major
Level II (A+) 29 19
66%
0 0 0
LINX/UNIX
System
Operation &
Administration 40 20
50%
0 0 0
MCITP Server
Administrator 25 25
100%
0 0 0
Media Studies 48.5 48.5
100%
0 0 0
Music
Technology 36 24
67%
0 0 0
Object-Oriented
Software Using
C++ 40 35
88%
0 0 0
Office Mgr -
General Office 60 41
68%
5.5 0 0%
Office Mgr -
Office Computing 58 44
76%
5.5 0 0%
Oracle Database
Administration 40 35
88%
0 0 0
Oracle Database
Developer 40 35
88%
0 0 0
Video Arts -
Media Studies 48.5 28.5
59%
0 0 0%
Video Arts
Production 49 42
86%
0 0 0
Web
Programming 40 35
88%
5 5 100%
Word
Processing/Deskt
op Publishing 35 20
57%
5.5 0 0%
41
Appendix C: Example Institutional Research Office Report
See PDF at
http://www.foothill.edu/staff/irs/programplans/docs/Prog%20Rev%20Combined%20Distance%2
0Ed/FH%20College%20Distance.pdf
Appendix D: Foothill College General Fund Unrestricted Operating Budget
42
Appendix D: J2W (ONLINE) STUDENT EVALUATION FORM
FOR INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY - PART A (Articles 6 and 6A – Evaluation)
Foothill-De Anza Community College District
Instructor____________________________________________________________________
Course (department, number) ____________________________________________________
Quarter/Year
One of the major responsibilities of the District is to promote high teaching standards among its
faculty. Please take the time to evaluate this course for your instructor.
PART A
Evaluate both the course and the instructor by marking the appropriate letter. Please be
thoughtful and candid in your responses.
Please mark the answer sheet for each of the following questions:
a = Strongly Agree
b = Agree
c = Disagree
d = Strongly Disagree
e = No Opinion/Not Applicable
About the Course:
1. The course contributed to my general knowledge and education.
2. Text/s and other instructional materials were appropriate and useful.
3. Course objectives and grading policies were specifically stated in writing and clearly
explained.
4. Amount and types of assigned course work were appropriate.
5. Course content was well organized.
6. Course activities were appropriate.
7. Tests were clearly written and related to subject matter.
8. Grading was fair and impartial.
About the Instructor:
9. Demonstrated an enthusiasm for the subject.
10. Was knowledgeable and prepared for online instruction.
11. Motivated student interest and intellectual effort.
12. Encouraged students to ask questions and participate in online learning activities.
13. Encouraged individual thinking and differences of opinion.
14. Provided effective online contributions and sites.
15. Maintained online course environment conducive to learning.
16. Communicated clearly.
17. Was accessible for individual communication.
18. Demonstrated sensitivity in working with students of diverse racial and ethnic
backgrounds, sexual orientations, and physical and mental disabilities.
19. Provided course materials online regularly and on time.
20. I would recommend this instructor.
APPENDIX J2W (ONLINE)
STUDENT EVALUATION FORM: FOR INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY - PART B
Foothill-De Anza Community College District
YOUR WRITTEN RESPONSES WILL BE FORWARDED TO YOUR INSTRUCTOR
AFTER THE END OF THE QUARTER
Instructor____________________________________________________________________
Course (department, number) ____________________________________________________
Quarter/Year
PART B
Written Evaluation (please respond to the following):
43
1. What did you like about this course?
2. What did you dislike about this course?
3. What specific changes could improve this course?
4. Please make any additional comments or suggestions about this course and/or this
instructor.

 

 

Evidence
History of Online at Mission - http://lamission.edu/de/online-history

Status of Online Classes/Degrees - 11-03-09

Updated Status of Subchange - 2-09-10

Mid-Term Accreditation Statement on DE - 2-18-10

Accreditation Midterm Report - March 2009

Recommendation of DE Committee to EPC on 3-18-24 to establish a Substantive Change Task Force

EPC Adopted Recommnedation 4-05-10, Academic Senate Adopted 5-6-10, College Council Adopted it on 5-20-10
9-22-10 - DE Committee develops 2 questions for Chairs and Vice Chairs - see minutes - http://abogado.pbworks.com/f/de-minutes-9-22-10-.htm

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.